Watercar: Philippine Innovation

Watercar
Daniel Dingel’s water-powered car traces its development back to 1969, per Philippine newspaper accounts and the inventor’s own claim that he has invested at least thirty years’ worth of work. Dingel has had several cars converted since that time – all his own.

The Daniel Dingel water car is not a fuel-cell car. Fuel cell cars like the new Honda FCX Clarity uses hydrogen gas to produce electricity in a fuel cell, and it is this electricity that powers the car’s electric motor. Also, fuel cell cars are reliant on hydrogen that is pre-extracted using costly methods.

Contrary to its name, Dingel’s car does not burn water. The inventor claims to have designed a process that efficiently maximizes on-demand hydrogen extraction from the electrolysis of ordinarily-available water. It is the hydrogen gas that his car burns directly in the engine’s combustion chamber. The extraction process being on-demand, Dingel’s car does not store hydrogen gas onboard in quantities that pose an explosion risk.

THOMAS Alva Edison conducted some 50,000 experiments on the battery to perfect its capacity to store power. To a friend who come to offer his condolences to the American inventor on the lack of results despite his efforts, Edison replied: “Why, man, I’ve gotten a lot of results! Now I know several thousand things that don’t work.”

Most Filipinos don’t know it, but we have in Paranaque, an inventor who displays the same trait, judging from the number of useful ideas he has thought up.

Daniel D. Dingel hails from La Union, his mother’s province, but lived in an orphanage, as his parents died when he was still young. Americans from Clark and Subic provided the lad opportunities for a predominantly technical education.

“I earned my mechanical engineering degree by dint of effort from the International Correspondence School. Perfected by practical experience, my educational attainment could be equated to a Ph.D.,” he says.

Dingel admits that he once nurtured the ambition to study for the priesthood but Providence willed otherwise, Still, he firmly decided to commit his God-given talent for invention to the service of humanity.

Skeptics

It was in the early 80s that Dingel came into the national limelight with his declaration that he had discovered a way to make a vehicle run on water.

This was in the wake of the first world oil crisis of the mid-70s which stunned everyone into realizing that petroleum was fast-dwindling natural resource and that western nations had to knock their noggins together to come up with alternative sources of fuel, fast.

Foreigners came flocking to grill Dingel about his invention, and a year or so later, one of them declared that the claim was hoax. But Dingel stuck to his guns and let Philippine authorities objectively evaluate his claim.

Test drives

In 1985, Dingel said, he drove his car from Metro Manila to Laguna over a distance of 167 kilometers consuming 15 liters of water and half a liter of gasoline.

When he made a trip to the US, he added, he had occasion to show Americans that his car could make the Detroit-to-Florida run on 60 liters of water and two liters of gasoline.

Government authorities have confirmed these claims in scientific tests and today Dingel drives a car with these words, in bold letters, painted on the rear windshield: “This car runs on water.”

How it works

In brief, Dingel’s invention uses gasoline only to get the engine started. Then water passes through two reactors in the engine which splits it into hydrogen and oxygen to trigger off combustion.

His related invention – the electromagnetic fluid, or EMF – is a lubricant additive made up of extracts from vegetables, leaves, flowers and trees and resinous materials and perfumes.

An ounce of this fluid, which bears the trademark EMF Fluxy Fluid 2000, is all that’s needed to cleanse an engine of accumulated carbon deposits and to limber it up over a guaranteed distance of 36,000 kilometers. This is equivalent to four years of running time without any adjustment or replacement of any mechanical part.

More demos

Dingel has full confidence in his EMF, offering a satisfaction-or-your-money-back guarantee on it. His latest demonstration of the surefire success of his EMF took place last Oct. 3. Among the spectators was mechanical engineer Gil Milag Buan, marketing manager of both Agile Technodynamics and of a family-owned electrical contracting firm.

“I was taken in by his demonstration of the potency and efficiency of EMF in just over two minutes during which a car rids itself of carbon dirt from its innards and runs with higher compression, less revolutions per minute and more torque, lesser knock, all on lesser fuel for more kilometers,” Buan says.

“He knows whereof he speaks after decades of hands-on work with engines of so many makes. But what drew me to him was his simplicity, unassuming attitude and humanitarianism for others who have less in life.”

A proud Pinoy, An Achiever, Daniel Dingel….

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About filipinoachievers

A former tubagatherer turned OFW on my journey towards a successful online free-content provider. Co-founder of PhilNews.Ph, one of the Philippines Top 200 websites based on Alexa Ranking.
This entry was posted in Filipino Inventors, Filipino Scientists and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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